Quantcast

Stitching Photos

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
6 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Stitching Photos

DERoss
I have two JPEG files, each with a photo.  I want to creat a single file
that has the photos stitched together side-by-side.  While I know how to
export an image from GIMP into a JPEG file, I cannot figure out how to
stitch two images together.  How do I do this?  Better, where in the
user documentation is this described?
_______________________________________________
gimp-user-list mailing list
List address:    [hidden email]
List membership: https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list
List archives:   https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Stitching Photos

Steve Kinney


On 05/03/2017 10:11 PM, DERoss wrote:
> I have two JPEG files, each with a photo.  I want to creat a single file
> that has the photos stitched together side-by-side.  While I know how to
> export an image from GIMP into a JPEG file, I cannot figure out how to
> stitch two images together.  How do I do this?  Better, where in the
> user documentation is this described?

There are automated tools to facilitate this, but I have not used them.

The manual process is not terribly complicated.

First, open one of the photos in the GIMP, then import the second photo
as a layer.  Drag and drop the second image to the image canvas, quick &
easy.

Next, do Image > Canvas size, and make the 'workspace' available big
enough to accommodate both photos side by side, with some room left over
to move them around.

Then align the photos so their edges fit together accurately.  How to do
this depends on the individual photos; some rotation and scaling (in
that order) of the layer you are moving around may be required to make
them match, and maybe a little tweaking with the Perspective tool, which
enables one to arbitrarily stretch a layer by repositioning its corners.

Note that when using the Rotate tool, you can move the center of
rotation by dragging the cross hair icon in the middle of the grid to
wherever you want it.  Making one detail near the top or bottom edge of
your upper layer match the lower one exactly, and putting the center of
rotation there, will save a lot of time and effort.

Adjusting the transparency of the upper layer to about 50% will greatly
assist in lining it up with the base layer.  When your alignment,
rotation, scaling etc. are

Once the two photos / layers are aligned and look right, "save" your
work as XCF, then save it again with a new name, i.e. add "-1" or
something to the name.  This is so you can go back and tweak your first
effort if and as needed.

To make a seamless transition from one image to another, it may be
helpful to add a layer mask to the upper image and use a very soft edged
brush (or the gradient tool) on the mask to fade the edge of the upper
image out a little.

Finally, crop the aligned photos to square up their edges, make any
necessary color, light, etc. adjustments, save that result as XCF and
export the image to your format of choice as a finished product.

Functions you may want to look up, if any are unfamiliar:  The Move
tool, Scale tool, Rotate tool, Perspective tool, layer opacity
adjustment, Crop tool.

I have made panoramas this way, and it worked out quite nicely.  I
cheated, though, by taking the original pictures with a camera on a
tripod, which make the assembly /way/ easier than hand held results permit.

:o)


_______________________________________________
gimp-user-list mailing list
List address:    [hidden email]
List membership: https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list
List archives:   https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Stitching Photos

Casey Connor-2
In reply to this post by DERoss
By 'stitch' I assume you mean 'combine in a relatively nuanced way', as
opposed to simply laying one image down next to the other...

The other reply explained the basics in GIMP. If you do this kind of
thing with any regularity, though, I'd recommend looking in to Hugin,
which is an amazing (and free/open source) tool for just this kind of work.

It's not obvious how to use it, though, so definitely read/watch some
tutorials before jumping in.

-c

On 05/03/2017 07:11 PM, DERoss wrote:

> I have two JPEG files, each with a photo.  I want to creat a single file
> that has the photos stitched together side-by-side.  While I know how to
> export an image from GIMP into a JPEG file, I cannot figure out how to
> stitch two images together.  How do I do this?  Better, where in the
> user documentation is this described?
> _______________________________________________
> gimp-user-list mailing list
> List address:    [hidden email]
> List membership: https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list
> List archives:   https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list

_______________________________________________
gimp-user-list mailing list
List address:    [hidden email]
List membership: https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list
List archives:   https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Stitching Photos

Dave Stevens
In reply to this post by Steve Kinney
On Thu, 4 May 2017 14:14:34 -0400
Steve Kinney <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 05/03/2017 10:11 PM, DERoss wrote:
> > I have two JPEG files, each with a photo.  I want to creat a single
> > file that has the photos stitched together side-by-side.  While I
> > know how to export an image from GIMP into a JPEG file, I cannot
> > figure out how to stitch two images together.  How do I do this?
> > Better, where in the user documentation is this described?  

use hugin, it's specifically for this purpose.

d

>
> There are automated tools to facilitate this, but I have not used
> them.
>
> The manual process is not terribly complicated.
>
> First, open one of the photos in the GIMP, then import the second
> photo as a layer.  Drag and drop the second image to the image
> canvas, quick & easy.
>
> Next, do Image > Canvas size, and make the 'workspace' available big
> enough to accommodate both photos side by side, with some room left
> over to move them around.
>
> Then align the photos so their edges fit together accurately.  How to
> do this depends on the individual photos; some rotation and scaling
> (in that order) of the layer you are moving around may be required to
> make them match, and maybe a little tweaking with the Perspective
> tool, which enables one to arbitrarily stretch a layer by
> repositioning its corners.
>
> Note that when using the Rotate tool, you can move the center of
> rotation by dragging the cross hair icon in the middle of the grid to
> wherever you want it.  Making one detail near the top or bottom edge
> of your upper layer match the lower one exactly, and putting the
> center of rotation there, will save a lot of time and effort.
>
> Adjusting the transparency of the upper layer to about 50% will
> greatly assist in lining it up with the base layer.  When your
> alignment, rotation, scaling etc. are
>
> Once the two photos / layers are aligned and look right, "save" your
> work as XCF, then save it again with a new name, i.e. add "-1" or
> something to the name.  This is so you can go back and tweak your
> first effort if and as needed.
>
> To make a seamless transition from one image to another, it may be
> helpful to add a layer mask to the upper image and use a very soft
> edged brush (or the gradient tool) on the mask to fade the edge of
> the upper image out a little.
>
> Finally, crop the aligned photos to square up their edges, make any
> necessary color, light, etc. adjustments, save that result as XCF and
> export the image to your format of choice as a finished product.
>
> Functions you may want to look up, if any are unfamiliar:  The Move
> tool, Scale tool, Rotate tool, Perspective tool, layer opacity
> adjustment, Crop tool.
>
> I have made panoramas this way, and it worked out quite nicely.  I
> cheated, though, by taking the original pictures with a camera on a
> tripod, which make the assembly /way/ easier than hand held results
> permit.
>
> :o)
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> gimp-user-list mailing list
> List address:    [hidden email]
> List membership:
> https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list List
> archives:   https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list



--
In modern fantasy (literary or governmental), killing people is the
usual solution to the so-called war between good and evil. My books are
not conceived in terms of such a war, and offer no simple answers to
simplistic questions.

----- Ursula Le Guin
_______________________________________________
gimp-user-list mailing list
List address:    [hidden email]
List membership: https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list
List archives:   https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Stitching Photos

Ofnuts-2
In reply to this post by DERoss
On 04/05/17 04:11, DERoss wrote:
> I have two JPEG files, each with a photo.  I want to creat a single file
> that has the photos stitched together side-by-side.  While I know how to
> export an image from GIMP into a JPEG file, I cannot figure out how to
> stitch two images together.  How do I do this?  Better, where in the
> user documentation is this described?
> _______________________________________________

Use Hugin. Stitching pictures properly requires distortions (projections
due to the rotation of you lens around a vertical axis).
Hugin knows how to do that, not Gimp.
_______________________________________________
gimp-user-list mailing list
List address:    [hidden email]
List membership: https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list
List archives:   https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Stitching Photos

Users mailing list
In reply to this post by DERoss
The previous answers assume that the two .jpeg photos' subjects are right next to each other,
and that you want to make one big photo - essentially a panorama.

I concur with their answer: hugin is good for that. Sometimes a minimum of work is needed;
sometimes more fiddling is necessary.

However, if the photos are unrelated, and you just want to place them next to each other,
a simpler procedure may be all that is necessary - I have done this all the time.  For example:
I often do screenshots of song lyrics for songs I like; sometimes I have to do more than one,
as they don't all fit on screen at once.

What I do is to use an image viewer to see the dimensions of each of the photos and write them down.
Depending on whether I want to put one image under another, or next to each other, I add the widths
or add the lengths, and use the lengths (or widths) for the other dimension.
(Naturally, if the two images are not the same size, one would just pick a set of dimensions that allows you
to fit both of the images into the final image.  The background color for the image would then show around
the smaller image, so select a color accordingly.  If you're going to print, then probably white would be best.)

In GIMP, before doing anything with the photos, do File-->New, and enter the dimensions of the combined
image. (->Advanced Options allows you to make the background transparent, white, or foreground/background
colors; Background Color is default).
Then, File->Open As Layers the two images.  If they are in the same folder, then pres Ctrl- when clicking on
the second file. If not, probably File->Open As Layers twice, once for each image.

There will now be three layers, one for each image, and a background underneath them.
The images will be centered on the larger space you created initially.

Just move the layers around your new larger image so that they are positioned as you want (Click on the Move
tool in the toolbox, or Tools->Transform Tools->Move; in the Tool Options dock, make sure Layers is selected
for what to move, and I checkbox Move the Active Layer; click first on the layer in the layer dock that you want to move,
then click on the image and move it) You can use the cursor keys to move in one pixel amounts (hold down the
shift- key to move in larger pixel increments). If the orientation is vertical, you would just use up- and down-keys;
if horizontal, left- and right-keys.

Then export as .jpeg (or whatever you want), giving it whatever name you want.

[I set the size first, before loading the images, because I have had problems before with images disappearing as they
are moved past boundaries; while this is no doubt a failure on my part to understand just what I am doing, the above
procedure has always worked for me.]
_______________________________________________
gimp-user-list mailing list
List address:    [hidden email]
List membership: https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list
List archives:   https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list
Loading...