Scaling an image down without ruining the text

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Scaling an image down without ruining the text

rich2005
Hi,

I have an image that is currently 2590 x 344. It is a footer image to be used in
auto generated letters for a bespoke CRM system that is currently being
developed. The required dimensions for the image are 790 x 115.

Unfortunately, when I scale the image down to these dimensions, the text
included on the image degrades and becomes completely unreadable. The entire
image also loses quality which isn't really acceptable, I need it to retain the
quality and the text to remain legible when scaling the image down.

Hope someone can help me out!

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Scaling an image down without ruining the text

rich2005
>Hi,
>
>I have an image that is currently 2590 x 344. It is a footer image to
>be used in auto generated letters for a bespoke CRM system that is
>currently being developed. The required dimensions for the image are
>790 x 115.
>
>Unfortunately, when I scale the image down to these dimensions, the
>text included on the image degrades and becomes completely unreadable.
>The entire image also loses quality which isn't really acceptable, I
>need it to retain the quality and the text to remain legible when
>scaling the image down.
>
>Hope someone can help me out!

Gimp is a raster editor (bitmap) editor any scaling up or down degrades the
image. Scaling down will 'throw' pixels away.

What might be possible and depending on the complexity of the image, is remove
somehow, usually 'clone-out' the text leaving the background and re-make the
text in the smaller image.

There is a practical limit on this, I would say anything smaller than 20 pt
(that is point not pixels) in the original is too small. 20 pt in the larger
image roughly equates to 8 pt in the smaller size.

notes:

2590x344 uniformly scales to 790x105 not 790x115

Avoid exporting in jpeg format, that introduces artefacts around small text, try
png.

What is the size of the printed letter? 790 pix is about 1/3rd the width of a
regular Gimp 300 ppi US letter template. 790 pix width for a footer seems small
to me.

Could you re-work your image in vector SVG format? Will that be acceptable to
your software? It might scale in the printed document better than a raster
image.

Attachments:
* http://www.gimpusers.com/system/attachments/612/original/2590x344.jpg
* http://www.gimpusers.com/system/attachments/613/original/790x115.png

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Re: Scaling an image down without ruining the text

Rick Strong-2
In reply to this post by rich2005
Try making your image at a very high DPI, say 1200 for text.
Or, when you scale down, make it 1200 or 2400 DPI.
Or, my choice, use a free vector editor like Inkscape and a hi-rez image
behind the text at final size.

Rick S.

-----Original Message-----
From: CC4581
Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2017 5:01 AM
To: [hidden email]
Cc: [hidden email]
Subject: [Gimp-user] Scaling an image down without ruining the text

Hi,

I have an image that is currently 2590 x 344. It is a footer image to be
used in
auto generated letters for a bespoke CRM system that is currently being
developed. The required dimensions for the image are 790 x 115.

Unfortunately, when I scale the image down to these dimensions, the text
included on the image degrades and becomes completely unreadable. The entire
image also loses quality which isn't really acceptable, I need it to retain
the
quality and the text to remain legible when scaling the image down.

Hope someone can help me out!

--
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Re: Scaling an image down without ruining the text

Liam R E Quin
In reply to this post by rich2005
On Thu, 2017-06-15 at 11:01 +0200, CC4581 wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I have an image that is currently 2590 x 344. It is a footer image to
> be used in auto generated letters for a bespoke CRM system that is
> currently being developed. The required dimensions for the image are
> 790 x 115.

Then develop the CRM system to support SVG vector images, or to be able
to add text to an image on the fly (e.g. see the gd library).


> Unfortunately, when I scale the image down to these dimensions,

As others pointed out, you can't scale down 2590x344 to get to 790x115
without adding distortion.

Make your larger image be a whole-number multiple of your target size -
ideally a power of two larger (2, 4, 8, 16...). It will scale don a LOT
better. For example, 3160 x 460 pixels (4 * 790, 4 * 115). If there was
a typo in your mail and you didn't mean 790x115, use 4 times the size
you meant :-)

Then use tool options to try the various different scaling algorithms
to see which is best. For Gimp 2.8 I'd likely do
(1) flatten the image
(2) gaussian blur 3x3
(3) scale down with "cubic" or "lancsoz" (experiment to compare)
(4) filters->enhance->sharpen (in 2.8 this is better than unsharp mask,
or I found it so, for this application).

For gimp 2.8 try without doing the blur first, and then try unsharp
mask after.

Then export, then undo to get back to having multiple layers.

You could also add the text later. For www.fromoldbooks.org I add the
text to the images using ImageMagick.

Liam


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