Re: 2019 project report

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Re: 2019 project report

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Thanks to everyone for all the hard work in 2019!

-C

On Sun, 5 Jan 2020, 09:19 Alexandre Prokoudine via gimp-developer-list, <
[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hello,
>
> Our annual GIMP/GEGL report is out:
>
> https://www.gimp.org/news/2020/01/04/gimp-and-gegl-in-2019/
>
> Enjoy :)
>
> Alex
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Re: 2019 project report

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Alex,

Thanks for putting together this report, I know it's a lot of work and
never much fun.

I was very intrigued by the opening remarks and "lessons learned" re: more
frequent releases.

In this spirit, I would like to resurrect a long dead thread, reference:
https://marc.info/?l=gimp-developer&m=134556216910609&w=2

At that time, Mark Shuttleworth was advocating that all FOSS projects adopt
a timed release process like Ubuntu's 6-month cycle. I believe Fedora does
this. One of his arguments was that regular releases makes planning easier
for distributors, but from your report I think that GIMP developers also
see the value in regular incremental releases.

In that thread from 2012 I proposed a 3-month release cycle. This is, and
was, a slightly slower pace than that used by the Linux kernel. The number
is arbitrary but I still think the results will be worthwhile. With 3
releases in 2019, a 4-month process may be a good place to start.

There are issues and challenges to doing this, and I think there are
answers to both, but I suggest this only to see if the interest is real.

Chris

PS - I use GIMP infrequently these days, but +1 on suggestion for a better
text tool. Given recent font tech (ligatures, font feature settings), it
seems something similarly sophisticated may be warranted here as well.
Perhaps direct import of HTML+CSS makes the most sense, even if it means
bundling an entire browser engine ... then maybe even a text edit tool
written in Electron? That can use browser-based editors? Short
justification: the web is defining modern typography, and raster
applications need to compete. Embrace and subsume...


On Sun, Jan 5, 2020 at 4:19 AM Alexandre Prokoudine via gimp-developer-list
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hello,
>
> Our annual GIMP/GEGL report is out:
>
> https://www.gimp.org/news/2020/01/04/gimp-and-gegl-in-2019/
>
> Enjoy :)
>
> Alex
> _______________________________________________
> gimp-developer-list mailing list
> List address:    [hidden email]
> List membership:
> https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-developer-list
> List archives:   https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-developer-list
>
_______________________________________________
gimp-developer-list mailing list
List address:    [hidden email]
List membership: https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-developer-list
List archives:   https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-developer-list