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300 dpi screen capture

ChadDavis
I'm trying to take some screen captures that will be used in a book.  How do I set the resolution / dpi of the screen capture device?  I tried setting the defulat new image parameters, but it doesn't seem to be used by the screen capture device. 

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Re: 300 dpi screen capture

Patrick Shanahan
* ChadDavis <[hidden email]> [02-22-08 17:21]:
> I'm trying to take some screen captures that will be used in a book.
> How do I set the resolution / dpi of the screen capture device?  I
> tried setting the defulat new image parameters, but it doesn't seem to
> be used by the screen capture device.


not worth the bother as screen resolutions are 75-100 dpi.  You get
that which it is.

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http://wahoo.no-ip.org     Photo Album:  http://wahoo.no-ip.org/gallery2
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Re: 300 dpi screen capture

ChadDavis
Does this mean it's impossible to get a good looking screen capture into a book?  I'm not sure I follow.

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 3:25 PM, Patrick Shanahan <[hidden email]> wrote:
* ChadDavis <[hidden email]> [02-22-08 17:21]:
> I'm trying to take some screen captures that will be used in a book.
> How do I set the resolution / dpi of the screen capture device?  I
> tried setting the defulat new image parameters, but it doesn't seem to
> be used by the screen capture device.


not worth the bother as screen resolutions are 75-100 dpi.  You get
that which it is.

--
Patrick Shanahan         Plainfield, Indiana, USA        HOG # US1244711
http://wahoo.no-ip.org     Photo Album:  http://wahoo.no-ip.org/gallery2
Registered Linux User #207535                    @ http://counter.li.org
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Re: 300 dpi screen capture

David Gowers (kampu)
In reply to this post by ChadDavis
You can use Image->scale image to directly set the DPI.
 In X11 it's possibly to directly set the dpi of the screen; however
if you did that, printing would probably be huge (as patrick says,
typical display devices are 75..100 DPI)

If it were me, I'd write a  script I could use from GIMP to set image
DPI to 300,300. the pdb call needed is
gimp-image-set-resolution (image, 300, 300)

On Sat, Feb 23, 2008 at 8:47 AM, ChadDavis <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I'm trying to take some screen captures that will be used in a book.  How do
> I set the resolution / dpi of the screen capture device?  I tried setting
> the defulat new image parameters, but it doesn't seem to be used by the
> screen capture device.
>
> _______________________________________________
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>
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Re: 300 dpi screen capture

ChadDavis
Isn't Patrick saying, basically, that since my screen has a fixed physical resolution, that's about the limit i can expect to actually get? 

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 3:38 PM, David Gowers <[hidden email]> wrote:
You can use Image->scale image to directly set the DPI.
 In X11 it's possibly to directly set the dpi of the screen; however
if you did that, printing would probably be huge (as patrick says,
typical display devices are 75..100 DPI)

If it were me, I'd write a  script I could use from GIMP to set image
DPI to 300,300. the pdb call needed is
gimp-image-set-resolution (image, 300, 300)

On Sat, Feb 23, 2008 at 8:47 AM, ChadDavis <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I'm trying to take some screen captures that will be used in a book.  How do
> I set the resolution / dpi of the screen capture device?  I tried setting
> the defulat new image parameters, but it doesn't seem to be used by the
> screen capture device.
>
> _______________________________________________
>  Gimp-user mailing list
>  [hidden email]
>  https://lists.XCF.Berkeley.EDU/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user
>
>


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Re: 300 dpi screen capture

Bugzilla from daniel.hornung@gmx.de
In reply to this post by ChadDavis
On Friday 22 February 2008, ChadDavis wrote:
> I'm trying to take some screen captures that will be used in a book.  How
> do I set the resolution / dpi of the screen capture device?  I tried
> setting the defulat new image parameters, but it doesn't seem to be used by
> the screen capture device.

When doing screen captures, you don't actually get any ppi at all, you just
get the plain pixels.  The resolution you attach to the image is quite
arbitrary.  When using it in a book, you might want to scale the image by an
integer scale with next neighbour "interpolation" though.  IMHO pixelized
screenshots look better than blurred ones on paper.  But maybe one of the
actual book writers on this list may tell you more. *hint*

Greetings, Daniel

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Re: 300 dpi screen capture

Michael J. Hammel
On Fri, 2008-02-22 at 23:41 +0100, Daniel Hornung wrote:
> But maybe one of the
> actual book writers on this list may tell you more. *hint*

I guess that's my cue.  :-)

The screen resolution is in pixels.  One pixel = one dot.  Most monitors
give you between 72 and 100 DPI, or dots per inch.  You'll notice that
you have a monitor that is 15"-24" inches across depending on how they
measure such things.  So you have 72*15 = 1080 dots across the screen
for the 15" monitor.  Now how do you convert that to printing for a
book?

Well, in the book you want the same image but at a smaller size.  A
typical book is likely less than a typical piece of paper (around 8.5").
In fact, the actual image size is likely to be around 2"-4" across.  So
what DPI do you need to squeeze 1080 dots into (splitting the
difference) 3"?  1080/3 = 360DPI.  If you set your image resolution
(using Image->Scale Image and changing the X and Y resolution) to 300
DPI, then your image will be 3.6" across.  How do I know this?  

1. Create a new image (blank white background) at any size.
2. Image->Scale Image, then set the width to 1080 pixels.  Click on
"Scale" to scale the image to that size.
3. Image->Scale Image, then set the resolution to 300 for the X and Y
resolution.  Click on "Scale" to change the image resolution.
4. Image->Scale Image, then change the options menu next to the "Height"
field from pixels to inches.  Now you can see how wide your image is
going to be when it's 1080 pixels across.

Clear as mud?  Try it a few times. It's not that hard to grasp once you
see it in action.
--
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[hidden email]                           http://graphics-muse.org
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Re: 300 dpi screen capture

ChadDavis
But doesn't this mean that if my the portion of the screen that I'm interested in is only 3 by 5 or so, then there is basically no way to get a non extrapolated set of pixels that will print to 3 by 5 on the page?

On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 3:57 PM, Michael J. Hammel <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Fri, 2008-02-22 at 23:41 +0100, Daniel Hornung wrote:
> But maybe one of the
> actual book writers on this list may tell you more. *hint*

I guess that's my cue.  :-)

The screen resolution is in pixels.  One pixel = one dot.  Most monitors
give you between 72 and 100 DPI, or dots per inch.  You'll notice that
you have a monitor that is 15"-24" inches across depending on how they
measure such things.  So you have 72*15 = 1080 dots across the screen
for the 15" monitor.  Now how do you convert that to printing for a
book?

Well, in the book you want the same image but at a smaller size.  A
typical book is likely less than a typical piece of paper (around 8.5").
In fact, the actual image size is likely to be around 2"-4" across.  So
what DPI do you need to squeeze 1080 dots into (splitting the
difference) 3"?  1080/3 = 360DPI.  If you set your image resolution
(using Image->Scale Image and changing the X and Y resolution) to 300
DPI, then your image will be 3.6" across.  How do I know this?

1. Create a new image (blank white background) at any size.
2. Image->Scale Image, then set the width to 1080 pixels.  Click on
"Scale" to scale the image to that size.
3. Image->Scale Image, then set the resolution to 300 for the X and Y
resolution.  Click on "Scale" to change the image resolution.
4. Image->Scale Image, then change the options menu next to the "Height"
field from pixels to inches.  Now you can see how wide your image is
going to be when it's 1080 pixels across.

Clear as mud?  Try it a few times. It's not that hard to grasp once you
see it in action.
--
Michael J. Hammel                                    Principal Software Engineer
[hidden email]                           http://graphics-muse.org
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Re: 300 dpi screen capture

Michael J. Hammel
On Fri, 2008-02-22 at 16:01 -0700, ChadDavis wrote:
> But doesn't this mean that if my the portion of the screen that I'm
> interested in is only 3 by 5 or so, then there is basically no way to
> get a non extrapolated set of pixels that will print to 3 by 5 on the
> page?

That's correct.  It's the nature of the hardware.  You can change the
DPI from 300 to 72 to match the monitor but the print will likely be of
much lower quality.

You can scale up the screen shot but I'd only double it's size once to
produce a larger print image at high DPI.  Even then, you're likely to
have a less than ideal print image.  Scaling up is not a good thing with
raster images.

For what it's worth, I tend to make all my screen shots for books and
magazines set to 250DPI, which produces a slightly larger print image at
reasonable quality.

--
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Re: 300 dpi screen capture

KenHTanaka
In reply to this post by ChadDavis

I would say that it's widely accepted that if you are including an image
in a book that represents a screen shot that is less than full screen,
you will magnify the image and use blocky pixel replication for text or
line graphics, and interpolated zooms for photographic subjects. I think
the readers will understand and be OK with that.

If your topic is vector graphic based, such as PDF or SVG, then it may
be reasonable to zoom your area of interest to a nice full screen smooth
and sharp image for screen shots, but you have to be careful not to
misrepresent what you are doing to the reader.

There is a screen that's close to 300dpi, but it's only about an inch
across on my iPod ;-), so I don't expect that to help.

-Ken

ChadDavis wrote:

> But doesn't this mean that if my the portion of the screen that I'm
> interested in is only 3 by 5 or so, then there is basically no way to
> get a non extrapolated set of pixels that will print to 3 by 5 on the
> page?
>
> On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 3:57 PM, Michael J. Hammel
> <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>     On Fri, 2008-02-22 at 23:41 +0100, Daniel Hornung wrote:
>     > But maybe one of the
>     > actual book writers on this list may tell you more. *hint*
>
>     I guess that's my cue.  :-)
>
>     The screen resolution is in pixels.  One pixel = one dot.  Most
>     monitors
>     give you between 72 and 100 DPI, or dots per inch.  You'll notice that
>     you have a monitor that is 15"-24" inches across depending on how they
>     measure such things.  So you have 72*15 = 1080 dots across the screen
>     for the 15" monitor.  Now how do you convert that to printing for a
>     book?
>
>     Well, in the book you want the same image but at a smaller size.  A
>     typical book is likely less than a typical piece of paper (around
>     8.5").
>     In fact, the actual image size is likely to be around 2"-4"
>     across.  So
>     what DPI do you need to squeeze 1080 dots into (splitting the
>     difference) 3"?  1080/3 = 360DPI.  If you set your image resolution
>     (using Image->Scale Image and changing the X and Y resolution) to 300
>     DPI, then your image will be 3.6" across.  How do I know this?
>
>     1. Create a new image (blank white background) at any size.
>     2. Image->Scale Image, then set the width to 1080 pixels.  Click on
>     "Scale" to scale the image to that size.
>     3. Image->Scale Image, then set the resolution to 300 for the X and Y
>     resolution.  Click on "Scale" to change the image resolution.
>     4. Image->Scale Image, then change the options menu next to the
>     "Height"
>     field from pixels to inches.  Now you can see how wide your image is
>     going to be when it's 1080 pixels across.
>
>     Clear as mud?  Try it a few times. It's not that hard to grasp
>     once you
>     see it in action.
>     --
>     Michael J. Hammel                                    Principal
>     Software Engineer
>     [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>    
>                           http://graphics-muse.org
>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     He doesn't have ulcers, but he's a carrier.
>     -- From a real employee performance evaluation.
>
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Re: 300 dpi screen capture

Akkana Peck
In reply to this post by Michael J. Hammel
Michael J. Hammel writes:
> On Fri, 2008-02-22 at 23:41 +0100, Daniel Hornung wrote:
> > But maybe one of the
> > actual book writers on this list may tell you more. *hint*
>
> I guess that's my cue.  :-)

Me too :-) except Michael has already covered it so well.
The only thing I'll add is that when I first started, I was
worried about one of Apress' guidelines that said they wanted
a particular dpi, so I started out being careful to set the
dpi after taking screenshots. I was also sending high-resolution
versions of non-screenshot images.

Once we got rolling, it turned out that their layout people scaled
each image to an appropriate size on the page, and nobody really
cared what dpi the images claimed to have. As long as I took normal
GIMP screenshots of reasonably-sized windows, everybody was happy.

The Apress style guide also had warnings about not using Windows
Print Screen, and more warnings about various other programs to
avoid under Windows (mostly color depth issues, I believe).  None
of that was a problem with the GIMP screenshots, which worked fine.

--
    ...Akkana
    "Beginning GIMP: From Novice to Professional"  http://gimpbook.com
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Re: 300 dpi screen capture

D.Jones (aka) Capnhud
In reply to this post by ChadDavis


Michael J. Hammel writes:
> On Fri, 2008-02-22 at 23:41 +0100, Daniel Hornung wrote:
> > But maybe one of the
> > actual book writers on this list may tell you more. *hint*
>
> I guess that's my cue.  :-)

Akkana Peck wrote:
Me too :-) except Michael has already covered it so well.
The only thing I'll add is that when I first started, I was
worried about one of Apress' guidelines that said they wanted
a particular dpi, so I started out being careful to set the
dpi after taking screenshots. I was also sending high-resolution
versions of non-screenshot images.

Once we got rolling, it turned out that their layout people scaled
each image to an appropriate size on the page, and nobody really
cared what dpi the images claimed to have. As long as I took normal
GIMP screenshots of reasonably-sized windows, everybody was happy.

The Apress style guide also had warnings about not using Windows
Print Screen, and more warnings about various other programs to
avoid under Windows (mostly color depth issues, I believe).  None
of that was a problem with the GIMP screenshots, which worked fine.




Where can you get a copy of this Apress style guide?  I searched their site but was unable to see
this guide.




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